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PREVIOUSLY IN THE COLLECTIONS

Capital Transit 1053 | Capital Transit 07 | WAMtVRy 51 | GVB 120 | WSTS 6062 | JTC 352
 
In the early hours of Sunday, September 28, 2003, a fire of unknown origin destroyed four streetcars from the Washington Street Car Collection, three Austrian trams from the International Collection, the Johnstown Traction Company car from the American Trolley Collection and their carhouse at the National Capital Trolley Museum.
 
The loss of Capital Transit Company 1053,the unique experimental streamlined car, and DC Transit 0509, the rare streetcar that once served Great Falls, Maryland has destroyed physical links to the technological development of streetcars in the Nation's Capital. Capital Transit 1053 was familiar to Washington residents living along Wisconsin Ave. in Georgetown and along Pennsylvania Avenue. Preserved by DC Transit in 1956, Capital Transit 1053 helped close out the trolley era in Washington, DC. Constructed in 1899 as an open air car, DC Transit 0509 survived several rebuildings and was last used during the construction of the Museum's demonstration railway. The loss of two Washington, DC snowsweepers ends the Museums ability to interpret street railway snow removal. One of the sweepers, Washington, Alexandria and Mt. Vernon 51,was the sole surviving car from the trolley lines that served Northern Virginia from the 1890's until the 1930's. Capital Transit 07 originally swept the snow along the route to Laurel, MD. Operating examples of the other cars lost in the fire, Graz 120, Vienna 6062 and its trailer and Johnstown Traction Company 352, exist elsewhere in Austria and in the United States but were significant in the Museum's overall interpretation of the development of the electric street car.
 
Thirty two days after the fire, following intense efforts by volunteers and contractors, and using its remaining collection of eleven cars, the Museum once again began offering trolley rides to the public.
 
Prior to the fire, the Trolley Museum had planned for the construction of a new display building that would have housed the destroyed streetcars. The design of this building features all-metal construction and a fire suppression system.
 


Capital Transit Company 1053
St. Louis Car Company, 1935

CTCo 1053

Principal Features

  • Double truck, Single end, Streamlined city car
  • Four GE 1193 motors
  • Capital 70 trucks
  • Pneumatic cam magnetic control

History

The newly formed Capital Transit Company (Capital Transit) ordered twenty cars for delivery in 1935. The specifications for these cars included many ideas being developed by the Electric Railway Presidents' Conference Committee ("PCC") for their standard street car design. To achieve these design requirements,the builders, J.G. Brill and St. Louis Car, had to use existing technology which would eventually make these cars orphans among 489 PCC cars. Dubbed "streamliners," the resulting cars were extremely popular with the public as they entered service between Rosslyn and 17th & Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E. With the opening on August 4,1935 of the "Capital Transit Community Terminal" at Wisconsin and Western Avenues, the entire group was assigned to the Friendship Heights to Barney Circle car line and dispatched from Tenallytown Carhouse on Wisconsin Avenue at Harrison Street, N.W. The Company's investment paid off in a twelve percent increase in patronage on Route 30. Following wartime service, the Company elected to retain and refit the ten-year old "experimental flagships." As street car routes were abandoned, the cars were effectively withdrawn from services the Company re-assigned them to Northern Carhouse in 1953. DC Transit System scrapped nineteen cars of the group in June,1959. Capital Transit l053 was the surviving member of the "1000" class.
 
Mr. O. Roy Chalk, president of DC Transit System, donated Capital Transit 1053 to the Museum in March, 1970.
 
This car was lost in the carhouse fire of September 28, 2003.
 


CTCo 07
 

Capital Transit Company 07
McGuire Company, 1899

CTCo 07
 

WA&MtV 51
J.G. Brill Company, 1905

Principal Features

  • Single truck, Double End, Snow Sweeper
  • 2 Westinghouse 101B motors for traction
  • 1 Westinghouse 101B motor for brooms
  • Westinghouse type K controllers

History

Capital Transit Company (CTCo)transferred thirty-five snow sweepers to D.C. Transit System (DCTS) in 1956. The Museum preserves DCTS 07 as CTCo 07 and DCTS 026 as Washington, Alexandria, and Mt. Vernon Railway (WAMtVRy) 51. CTCo 07 is one of ten snow sweepers purchased on account for Washington Traction and Electric (WTE)from the McGuire Company in 1899. WTE suffered foreclosure in 1901 with properties conveyed February 4, 1902 to the Washington Railway and Electric Company (WRECo).Reacting to an order of the District Electric Railway Commission, WRECo enclosed the sweepers' open vestibules. With the merger of Capital Traction and WRECo in 1933, these ten sweepers became CTCo 06 through CTCo 15. WAMtVRy contracted in 1905 with the J.G. Brill Company for one sweeper, WAMtVRy 51. Sold by a successor company, the sweeper became WRECo 026 and eventually CTCo 026. The sweepers were equipped with rotating brooms of bamboo reeds which would throw snow to the right side of the track. CTCo posted Duties of Motormen and Barnmen on Snow Sweepers on each car. "Motormen will be governed by the regulations and schedules applying to the operation of a passenger car, but must bear in mind that they are handling an extraordinary piece of machinery that should be at all times under absolute control...When horses standing in the street show signs of fright, notify barnman to stop brooms and wait for someone to go ahead and hold horses...Care must be used not to throw snow or slush on pedestrians...Notify barnman when to run and when to stop running the brooms...Barnmen do not run brooms except when necessary."
 
Museum members, Vernon Winn and Earl Shumaker, purchased DCTS 07 and gave it to the Museum. DCTS gave DCTS 026 to the Museum.
 
Both cars were lost in the carhouse fire of September 28, 2003.
 


Graz, Austria

Grazer Verkehrsbetriebe 120
Grazer Waggonfabrik, 1909

GVB 120

Principal Features

  • Two axle, Double end City tram
  • Trailer connections
  • Two motors

History

Grazer Waggonfabrik delivered nine trams (GTG 80-88) to Grazer Tramway Gesellschaft in 1909. These trams featured extended vestibule areas to accommodate boarding and alighting passengers without crowding the motorman and conductor. Curiously, these larger platforms were only partially enclosed with windshields but no doors. Grazer Tramway replaced the truck on GTG 88 in 1918. Grazer Verkehrsbetriebe rebuilt the bodies of the five existing trams of the series in 1953-54. As reconstructed with platform doors, GVB 88 became GVB 120 assigned primarily on Route 2 to serve the Hauptbahnhof (main railway station). November 14, 1963 marked its last revenue service in Graz. Six years later GVB 120 began its service at the Museum while sister trams GVB 117 (GTG 87) and GVB 121 (GTG 81) became part of the collection at the Tramway Museum Graz.
 
Like the other trams in the International Streetcar Collection, GVB 120 utilizes dynamic braking as its primary braking system. The energy of the moving tram turns the motors which become generators whose current is directed to resistance grids which dissipate the electric energy as heat. The current is directed to grids on the roof in summer and inside the body in winter. As the tram slows below two miles per hour, the braking effect ends and the hand brake makes the final stop possible. The few stops made at the Museum encouraged the installation of a separate heating circuit in GVB 120.
 
This car was lost in the carhouse fire of September 28, 2003.
 

Vienna, Austria

Wiener Stadtwerke Verkehrsbetriebe 6062
Simmeringer Waggonfabrik, 1910

Wiener Stadtwerke Verkehrsbetriebe 7802
Waggonfabrik Stauding, 1908

WSTS 6062

Principal Features

Motor Car 6062
  • Two axle, Double end City Tram
  • Trailer Connections
  • Two Motors
Trailer Car 7802
  • Two axle, Double end Trailer
  • Electric brake

History

When the electrification of the large horse tramway system in the capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire began, two firms (Bau-und Betriebsgesellschaft fur Stadtische Strassenbahnen in Wien and Neue Wiener Tramway Gesellschaft) ordered 520 two-axle motorized trams with open vestibules and eight windows per side which layout they designated Type G. The companies modified this design to include closed vestibules for Type H and ordered 130 units in 1910 from Grazer Waggonfabrik and Simmeringer Waggonfabrik. Built by the later firm, WStW2249 carried twenty-two passengers on wood slat seats and another thirty-five as standees. Wiener Stadtwerke improved the design (now Type H1) in 1935 by changing the gearing to increase top speed from 25 kilometers per hour to 30 kilometers per hour. After the German Reich absorbed Austria in 1938, Lohnerwerke rebuilt the body to conform to right-hand traffic flow. WStW 2249 received its work tram number, WStW 6062 (Type HP)on September 30, 1962 as Weiner Stadtwerke reserved it for snowplow service.
 
Waggonfabrik Stauding, now located in the Czech Republic, constructed WStW3386 as a trailer with closed vestibules and eight windows per side. With a passenger capacity similar to WStW 2249, it remained in service until May, 1966. On June 15, 1966 Weiner Stadtwerke assigned work car number WStW 7802 (Type KP) but did not rebuild or use as a work tram.
 
Wiener Stadtwerke Verkehrsbetriebe withdrew WStW 6062 and WStW 7802 on April 23, 1969 and presented them to the Museum.
 
This streetcar and its trailer were lost in the carhouse fire of September 28, 2003.
 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Johnstown Traction Company 352
St. Louis Car Company, 1926

JTCo 352

Principal Features

  • Double truck
  • Double end
  • Arch-roof city car
  • Four motors
  • EDJ 64 trucks
  • Rattan seats

History

The Johnstown Traction Company (JTCo) ordered twenty cars from the St. Louis Car Company for delivery in 1926. As described by the builder, "these cars have straight sides; round ends; steel bulkheads; arched roof; continuous stationary upper sash; lover sash to raise; offset drop platforms with folding doors and stepson all four corners; detachable bonnets; quadruple 35 HP motor equipment and air brakes with safety features. Interior finish of cherry, brass sash, and spring rattan seats. Cars are brilliantly lighted ... A number of these cars of same dimension were built for single end operation, stream line (sic) painting is used, colors being blue,white, red and gray dash." Painted Omaha Orange and Panama Sand with gray roof, black undercarriage, and black striping, the double-end JTCo 350 to JTCo 354 enabled the retirement of the last single-truck cars on the railway.
 
JTCo 352 served the citizens of an important steel-producing Pennsylvania city through World War II and into the prosperous 1950's. Seventeen modern,Presidents' Conference Committee (PCC) cars joined the older cars like JTCo 352 in January 1947. However, the growing national economy began to leave Johnstown behind as competition in the steel industry developed. The combination of increasing automobile ownership and declining population doomed JTCo streetcar operation. Within five years of the PCC arrivals, JTCo converted the Horner Street line to trackless trolleys (electric buses). By 1959 conversions were well underway as trolley fans flocked to the city to charter special cars. Museum members selected JTCo 352 for preservation and chartered the car for a farewell trip on April 24, 1960. All streetcar service ended on June 11, 1960.
 
The Museum purchased JTCo 352 and transported the car first to storage in Dundalk, then to its Lake Roland site, and later to Northwest Branch Park.
 
In 2001, JTCo 352 returned to service following restoration.
 
This car was lost in the carhouse fire of September 28, 2003.
 
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Copyright © National Capital Trolley Museum
May 2005, revised October 28, 2007